Last edited by Malat
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States found in the catalog.

A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States

A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States

from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent constitution

  • 197 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Evans and Cogswell in Columbia [S.C.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementanalytically arranged by W.W. Lester and Wm. J. Bromwell
SeriesConfederate imprints, 1861-1865 -- reel 2, no. 31
ContributionsBromwell, William Jeremy, 1834-1874, Confederate States of America
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationvii, 329, [1] p.
Number of Pages329
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15174314M

Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States. II. Provisional Army IX. CONSCRIPTION [dtd 4/16/] "A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States," Confederate Quartermaster-General's Office, pp. , Richmond, A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States, from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the .

  I have an original confederate states book entitled "A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States", published in , and signed by Cole L. Blease (with signature dated ). I read more5/5(K). A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States, from the commencement of the Provisional congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent constitution. Columbia S. C. Evans and Cogswell, (See the librarian for location) The United States Statutes at Large For Civil War Era laws of the Union. Maps.

The following Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States are published by direction of the President for the government of all concerned. They will accordingly be strictly obeyed, and nothing contrary to them will be enjoined or permitted in any portion of the forces of the Confederate States by the officers thereof. JAMES A. SEDDONFile Size: KB. Confederate Navy Index. Search the database. Admiral Augustus O. Wright, at the urging of fellow members of the United Confederate Veterans, led an initiative in to obtain military records of approximately 6, men who served in the Confederate States Navy.


Share this book
You might also like
Kcpt Nest, the Is (Kinderconcepts)

Kcpt Nest, the Is (Kinderconcepts)

German literary influences on the American transcendentalists

German literary influences on the American transcendentalists

Working smart

Working smart

Assassination and significance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Assassination and significance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Baja California and the geography of hope.

Baja California and the geography of hope.

A History of the Black Community of Orlando, Florida

A History of the Black Community of Orlando, Florida

Classic dolls houses

Classic dolls houses

Reports of cases in the Court of Nizamut Adawlut

Reports of cases in the Court of Nizamut Adawlut

UK external trade area x commodity analysis

UK external trade area x commodity analysis

Industrial Revolution in Belgium and Holland 1700-1914

Industrial Revolution in Belgium and Holland 1700-1914

man in the moon, 1638.

man in the moon, 1638.

Training and retraining needs in the printing and allied trades.

Training and retraining needs in the printing and allied trades.

A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States Download PDF EPUB FB2

A digest of the military and naval laws of the confederate states, from the commencement of the provisional congress to the end of the first congress under the permanent constitution. analytically arranged by capt. lester, of the quartermaster-general's office, and wm. bromwell, of the department of state, attorneys-at-law.

Get this from a library. A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent Constitution. [W W Lester; Wm J Bromwell; Confederate States of America.].

A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent Constitution by Confederate States of America; Bromwell, Wm. (William Jeremy), ; Lester, W. Pages: A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States, From the Commencement of the Provisional Congress to the End of the First Congress Under the Permanent Constitution: Author: Confederate States of America: Note: Columbia, SC: Evans and Cogswell, Link: HTML and TEI at UNC: Link: multiple formats at : Stable.

A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States, From the Commencement of the Provisional Congress to the End of the First Congress Under the Permanent Constitution.

Columbia: Evans and Cogswell, Full text of "A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under. A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent constitution.

/, by W. Lester, Wm. Bromwell, and Confederate States of America (page images at HathiTrust). THE CONFEDERATE STEAM NAVY: DONALD L. CANNEY SCHIFFER PUBLISHING, HARDCOVER, $, PAGES, PHOTOGRAPHS, ILLUSTRATIONS, DIAGRAMS, APPENDIX, ENDNOTES, BIBLIOGRAPHY, INDEX The Union and Confederate navies fought their naval battles with an astonishing variety of warships/5(10).

A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States (Columbia, SC: Evans and Cogswell, ). Confederate States Navy Department.

Ordnance Instructions for the Confederate States Navy, Relating to the Preparation of Vessels of War for Battle, Third Edition (London: Saunders, Otley & Company, ). The Navy of the Confederate States (CSN) was the naval branch of the Confederate States Armed Forces, established by an act of the Confederate States Congress on Febru It was responsible for Confederate naval operations during the American Civil War (–), fighting against the Union Navy / United States y: Confederate States.

A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States () A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States, from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent Constitution () Regulations for.

The Confederate Naval Academy. Page - No slave or other person held to service or labor in any State or Territory of the Confederate States, under the laws thereof, escaping or unlawfully carried into another, Confederate Military History: A Library of Confederate States History, Volume The Story Of The Confederate States' Ship Virginia; Strait Comparison: Lessons Learned from the Dardanelles Campaign DIGEST CATALOGUE OF LAWS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS.

THE NAVY AND THE WORLD WAR. JUNE, Published under the direction of. Act to extend protection to the civil rights of the members of the Military and Naval. Confederate military authorities were only empowered to arrest civilians so they could be either discharged by or held indefinitely to be tried at a later date, according to “A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States,” a comprehensive compilation of.

A History of the Confederate Navy is probably the only important book on the U.S. Civil War that was first written in Italian and then translated into English. Nonetheless, historian Raimondo Luraghi offers the fullest account to date of the South's naval activity. He challenges the popular notion that the Confederate navy was a failure because it did not break the North's by:   All other territories become Confederate states, because the Montgomery Constitution of was a vast improvement over the US Constitution.

The USA becomes a nation bordered on the north by Canada, on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the south and west by the CSA. A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the First Congress under the permanent Constitution by Confederate States of America 2 editions - first published in Page 58 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war.

Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under the enemy's flag. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.

History. The Department of the Navy was established by an act of the Provisional Confederate Congress in Montgomery, Alabama which passed into law on Febru This act also established the position of Secretary of the Navy which was according to the act authorized to handle all affairs related to the navies of the Confederacy.

President Jefferson Davis nominated Stephen Mallory and Agency executive: Stephen R. Mallory, Secretary of the. A digest of the military and naval laws of the Confederate States: from the commencement of the Provisional Congress to the end of the first Congress under the permanent constitution, by Confederate States of America.

Information in Relation to the Naval Protection Afforded to The Commerce of the United States in the West India Islands, &c. &c. Information Operations, Electronic Warfare, and Cyberwar Injury and Destruction of Navy Vessels by Earthquakes, Dec. InPresident Theodore Roosevelt and his wife made a tour of the Southern states.

This tour was reported in an article entitled “Visit of the President to the South,” which appeared in The Confederate Veteran, Volume XIII, No. 9, November,pp. It was a “different era” in   Texts of the various acts can be found in A Digest of the Military and Naval Laws of the Confederate States, Provisional and First Congresses (Columbia, S.C.: Evans & Cogswell, ), ff.; the text of the Februact can be found in Public Laws of the Confederate State of America, Fourth Session, First Congress, –Cited by: 7.